A place where nations and rivers unite and divide

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1 comment   |   Canada, Travel

 

 

Notre Dame of Montreal Basilica

Anna and I spent three days in Montreal. It is the most populous municipality in the Canadian province of Quebec and the second-most populous municipality in Canada. Originally called Ville-Marie, or “City of Mary”, it is named after Mount Royal, the triple-peaked hill in the heart of the city. The city is centred on the Island of Montreal, which took its name from the same source as the city, and a few much smaller peripheral islands, the largest of which is Île Bizard. It has a distinct four-season continental climate with warm to hot summers and cold, snowy winters

French is the city’s official language and is the language spoken at home by 49.8% of the population of the city, followed by English at 22.8% and 18.3% other languages according to the  2016 census.

Convention Cente

Historically the commercial capital of Canada, Montreal was surpassed in population and in economic strength by Toronto in the 1970s. It remains an important centre of commerce, aerospace, transport, finance, pharmaceuticals, technology, design, education, art, culture, tourism, food, fashion, gaming, film, and world affairs. Montreal has the second-highest number of consulates in North America, serves as the location of the headquarters of the International Civil Aviation Organization, and was named a UNESCO City of Design in 2006. In 2017, Montreal was ranked the 12th most liveable city in the world, well behind Melbourne and Canberra,  by the Economist Intelligence Unit in its annual Global Liveability Ranking, and the best city in the world to be a university student in the QS World University Rankings.

Olympic Stadium

Montreal has hosted the 1976 Summer Olympics.

Montreal was the capital of the Province of Canada from 1844 to 1849, but lost its status when a Tory mob burnt down the Parliament building to protest the passage of the Rebellion Losses Bill. Thereafter, the capital rotated between Quebec City and Toronto, until in 1857 Queen Victoria herself established Ottawa as the capital, for strategic reasons. The reasons were twofold; as it was located more in the interior of the Province of Canada, it was less susceptible to US attack. Perhaps more importantly, as it lay on the border between French and English Canada, the small town of Ottawa was seen as a compromise between Montreal, Toronto, Kingston and Quebec City, (not unlike Canberra) who were all vying to become the young nation’s official capital. Ottawa retained the status as capital of Canada when the Province of Canada joined with Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to form the Dominion of Canada in 1867.

Glass Sculpture worth 6M$
Taken inside during winter

There are many historic buildings in Old Montreal in their original form: Notre Dame of Montreal Basilica, Bonsecours Market, and the 19th?century headquarters of all major Canadian banks on St. James Street (French: Rue Saint Jacques). Montreal’s earliest buildings are characterized by their uniquely French influence and grey stone construction.

Notre-Dame Basilica (French: Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal) is a basilica in the historic district of Old Montreal, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The church is located at 110 Notre-Dame Street West, at the corner of Saint Sulpice Street. It is located next to the Saint-Sulpice Seminary and faces the Place d’Armes square.

Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal

The interior of the church is amongst the most dramatic in the world and regarded as a masterpiece of Gothic Revival architecture] The vaults are coloured deep blue and decorated with golden stars, and the rest of the sanctuary is decorated in blues, azures, reds, purples, silver, and gold. It is filled with hundreds of intricate wooden carvings and several religious statues. Unusual for a church, the stained glass windows along the walls of the sanctuary do not depict biblical scenes, but rather scenes from the religious history of Montreal. It also has a Casavant Frères pipe organ, dated 1891, which comprises four keyboards, 92 stops using electropneumatic action and an adjustable combination system, 7000 individual pipes and a pedal board.

The Underground City (officially RESO) is an important tourist attraction. It is the set of interconnected shopping

The Whisperers

complexes (both above and below ground). This impressive network connects pedestrian thoroughfares to universities, as well as hotels, restaurants, bistros, subway stations and more, in and around downtown with 32 kilometres of tunnels over twelve square kilometres of the most densely populated part of Montreal.

Public piano

The city has several quarters where specific communities come together. The Village, China Town and the Latin Quarter to name some.

Public art is a big deal in Montreal. Statues abound and also there are a dozen pubic pianos.

If you would like to see more photographs
https://krasney.smugmug.com/Travel-Galleries/Canada

 

  1. Trev09-04-19

    Sounds like an interesting place to visit. Like the idea of PUBIC pianos! LOL